Natural Cures for a Bee Sting

Homeopathics  

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Posted by Lover Of Truth (Bloomington, In) on 08/07/2011
5 out of 5 stars

I recently took my mother's truck to the gas station to be filled up. It had been sitting in the field unused for some time so when I went to open the gas tank I hand no idea there was a mini wasp's nest inside. It literally was a second or less before I was stung after opening the hinged lid. It was the most painful sting I've ever had and went super deep inside. Unfortunately it was a half an hour or so before I could treat it which may have contributed the the reaction. My hands over a 5 hour period swelled up like balloons and stayed that way for days. It was so bad I could not fully clench my hand nor see my knuckles. At any rate I tried everything I knew. I tools lots of MSM and c. I took benadryl. I took lots of bromelein on a empty stomach. I took apple cider finger internally and topically. I also tried bentonite clay. Nothing seemed to help. Now so could say it was just time but when I put the first dose of a gel made for stings on my wound at night by the next morning the swelling had reduced by 80-90%. I was so impressed I kept putting it on my hand till by the next day it was totally healed. For those interested some of the ingredients included arnica, calendula, echinacea, hypericum, ledum, and pyrethrum. This site in my opinion is like a science test so if others experience something similar I'd be interested to see if it works as a general rule or was just an isolated incident.

Replied by Andrea C
Cardiff, Wales
08/07/2011

RUB VINIGAR ON IT. IT WORKS! ALSO DOCK LEAVES. U ALWAYS FIND DOCK LEAVES GROWING BY NETTLES. THEY NEAUTRALISE THE FORMIC ACID IN THE STING, SAME 4 ANT STINGS. LOVE ANDREA C X X X

Replied by Lover Of Truth
Bloomington, In
08/07/2011

I apologize for so many typos. I wrote this on my iPad which not only wrongly autocorrects typos often due to the keyboard but also would not let me scroll up the form to make corrections. Hopefully you can figure out what the sentences should read as this truly was helpful for me. I'd like to know others could use this information to get relief.

Replied by Frankie H.
Oregon, Usa
08/01/2015

Hey LOVER OF TRUTH, IN. What homeopathic did you put on your sting? OR was it something else? Would love to have that in our first aid kit! Thank you very much!


Honey  

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Posted by Amanda (Sacramento, Ca) on 10/14/2010
5 out of 5 stars

My two year old daughter got stung by a bee at a friends house. I had to think quick on what to use that they would have and knowing honey is a natural antiseptic I applied it to her sting. It took less than a minute for her to stop crying and wanting to play again. It worked amazingly. The honey was not organic or raw just store brand. Although at my house we use all organic raw honey which is great. We use it as a face wash and I love it for my Acne prone skin.


Posted by Sandy (Bethlehem, PA) on 09/28/2007
5 out of 5 stars

I have found that nothing works better for me for a bee sting than pure raw honey. Just dab a little bit on the sting and cover with a bandaid. The enzymes in the honey neutralize the bee venom and the pain from the sting will subside within 1-5 minutes. No lie! It also helps to draw out the stinger. Works for wasp and hornet stings as well.

Replied by Anne
Rancho Cordova, California
07/18/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Bee Sting Remedies: Being English, this was my first inclination. So when checking this site I was pleased to see it listed. Following the instructions exactly, it really did work in 5mins. on a gentleman of 72 yrs of age and I felt very comfortable using it on a senior. Thanks Anne...

P.S. a dab and cover with a badaid. I barely put a little Honey on the tip of my finger, smeared it, then applied it to the yellowjacket sting, which was on the ear and quite a few hours old.

Replied by Jamie
Los Angeles, Ca
06/25/2012
5 out of 5 stars

I just went to the beach after visting the market to get a deli sandwich. Oddly enough, I bought some raw honey because I was out and thought, "why not?" I took that with me in my beach bag. Well, wouldn't you know it, I lay down on my towel, took a bite out of my sandwich, and got stung by a bee. I knew there wasn't much I could do, so I thought I would just stick it out. After a little while it started to burn, and it occurred to me to use THE HONEY! "Well, if the bees make it, I'm sure it works on their own venom" I thought. I dabbed it on and the pain was quickly gone, and the big white welt around the stinger-point was gone too. Very odd coincidence that I had the honey! Even magical, I would say. The last time I got stung by a bee, a friend heated a butter knife and held it just above the sting-point. The heat "drew out" the venom. It worked, but was certainly not as painless or soothing as lovely, sticky honey. :)


Lavender Oil  

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Posted by Jennifer (Guelph, Ontario, Canada) on 10/05/2007
5 out of 5 stars

My 3 year old daughter was stung by a bee for the first time. She didn't have a big reaction but it hurt, a lot. I tried Chickweed which helped for a minute, then breatmilk and that did nothing. But then I put pure Lavander oil on it and it took the pain away instantly.


Posted by Sarah (North Vancouver, Canada) on 08/20/2007
5 out of 5 stars

We were just away at a ranch, lots of horse flies, wasps etc. My 7 month old grabbed a wasp in mid area and was stung in the inside of his finger... Right away he was crying in pain and we saw the wasp dead beside him and we knew he had been stung, his little finger was as hard as a rock and i was getting worried of what type of reaction he was going to have...his hand and arm started to quickly get red and swell...The people we were with had pure essential Lavender oil and we rubbed it on the finger and hand, I would have to say within 5 minutes the pain was forgotten red gone and swelling completely gone... I was amazed... someone older was stung also and we did the same thing and he said the pain was gone right away... We have our own now and keep it with us.


Lemons  

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Posted by Desiree (Putnam Valley, New York) on 07/28/2007
5 out of 5 stars

My daughter and her friends were playing in the yard when one of them was stung by a wasp right on her hand. I went into my home remedies book and they said that you should put lemon on it, thank god I had a lemon in the fridge. I washed the bite with ACV first and then had her hold a slice of fresh lemon on it for about 5 minutes and she said it felt much better and her crying stopped almost immediately. I know if you have small children and live in the woods like I do you should definately keep a lemon on hand at all times.


Meat Tenderizer  

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Posted by Tim (Houston, Texas) on 03/28/2007
5 out of 5 stars

ACV doesn't work on bee stings. But here what does... apply meat tenderizer (mixed until it becomes a paste) to sting for 3-5 minutes, then soak in ice water or ice pack for about 5 minutes, then apply aloe vera for a few minutes. Pain gone, swelling gone, and poison reduced.

Replied by Robert
Martinez, Ca
09/02/2010

I wanted to expand a bit on the meat tenderizer whose prime ingredient is MSG. I was once told by a Pharmacist that MSG, (monosodium glutamate), is 'protiolytic', meaning it breaks down the protein bonds of the bee venom. So making a paste of this & applying to the affected area will work & is probably the only good use of MSG which was, as I understand, first used by the Japanese in WWII to keep their field rations fresh tasting. Some of these rations were taken back to the U. S. & analyzed whereupon the MSG was found. I was told by a Chinese chef that MSG is harmfully activated when heated & should be added after the food is cooked. I have had bad experiences ingesting Chinese foods heavily 'laced' with MSG & found a quick cure in using sudafed or other antihistamines. If you don't have MSG available for the sting, use a mud pack & you can get creative by mixing in vinegar, or good air dried salt. Homeopathics to have on the shelf are Apis, Arnica, Rhus Tox, or the poison oak/ivy combo. Homeopathic sting/insect bite gel works very well. Calamine w/Benadril works well in a pinch.


MSM  

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Posted by Paolo (Bloomington, In, Usa) on 08/04/2010
5 out of 5 stars

A few weeks ago when I was weeding I accidentally grabbed a bee in the process and got stung really hard on my palm near the thumb. I had listened to David Wolfe's lectures who once talked about how he got stung and cured it with MSM. He claimed to carry some in his pack whenever hiking. He said once when stung he poured some on his bite and took all the rest of the MSM he had. Well I decided to repeat this process by making a salve of MSM and water and taking about 10 pills. I suppose that's about 5000 mg worth. Though quite swollen at first the swelling did seem to subside quite a bit. After washing off the salve I put on the bentonite healing clay that the Native American's used as a topical remedy. Finally after letting this dry I washed this off too. I then used ACV soaked cotton ball which really helped with the pain. Long story short before I went to bed it was all but gone... And by morning not a trace was left that I had ever been stung. All this was done without the use of antihistamines. I call that quite a testament for the healing power of nature.


Mud  

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Posted by Anna (St Julians, Malta) on 09/21/2008
5 out of 5 stars

I want to thank you all for this website. I use it for every ailment any of my family might suffer from. It is always the first place I look. I have tried turmeric for boils, garlic for colds and many others and thank god they all worked, so thanks again. I am also allergic to bee stings and swell up straight away. Since I was a child when ever my brothers and sisters got stung which was often as we were always in the garden my father always made a mud pack and placed it on the bite. Just plain soil and water. Leave it on till it dries and then brush off. I have always used it on my kids and friends and it works every time. As the mud dries it draw out the poison and the swelling. Hope you find this useful.


Posted by Lin (Yellow Springs, Ohio) on 08/26/2008
5 out of 5 stars

Mud has cured my family's external bee stings for over 35 years. Wherever you are, there is mud, all you need is a little water. Just make a paste and slap it on. I've used it for a one year old baby whose piercing screams stopped within seconds, for a panic d customer in a store to our dog's paw just yesterday. The mud does it all, draws out the stinger and the poison - fast. Leave on from 2-20 min. Rinse off, then wash with soap and water. Relax and have a glass of water.


Posted by Michelle (Lamora, Mexico) on 03/06/2008
5 out of 5 stars

rub wet mud on the bee sting. also frsh garlic clove cut in half, also we've used charcoal internally and rubbed on the bite, these have always worked.


Multiple Remedies  

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Posted by Suzanne (Chattanooga, Tn) on 07/23/2018
1 out of 5 stars

Ambushed by yellow jackets! Can't see them all but think I have six stings, behind my knees and on my calves. Both legs. Since last night, I have tried Tecnu gel, lavender essential oil, internal and external ACV, crushed garlic, even took CBD oil. My muscles are really tight, hurts to walk. Ideas? Thanks!

Replied by Mmsg
Somewhere, Europe
07/23/2018

Suzanne, try a paste made of baking soda and water, or wet clay or wet activated charcoal (very messy).

Replied by Anon
Usa
07/23/2018

Ideas:

Magnesium, maybe soak in the tub with epsom salts

Rub isopropyl alcohol on the stings

Activated charcoal poultice

Rub castor oil over the stings

Rub cayenne on them, mix with castor oil?

Peppermint oil

Take antihistamine

Take vitamin c, e

Tea tree oil

Oregano oil

For mosquito bite rubbing salt grains into the bite makes it stop itching and go away

Maybe hold ice cube against bite.

Replied by Jim
Frostburg, Md
07/24/2018

I also heartily recommend MMSG's advice. A paste made with just water and baking soda has never failed me. Keep the paste wet for a half-hour and within a few minutes, it will greatly (greatly) reduce the pain and resultant swelling.

Replied by Jim
Frostburg, Md
07/25/2018

This remedy I gave is for use immediately after being stung or bitten. In the original poster's case, however, the effects are already manifest- and so this baking soda paste far too late to combat the venom. Perhaps a long soak in the tub with Epsom Salts?


Onion  

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Posted by Mike (Missouri) on 12/09/2014
5 out of 5 stars

Onion does work very well for bee or wasp stings- simply cut in half, score the onion surface until juicy, and apply directly to skin/sting site.

It does not "draw out" the toxin, rather the onion juice/ phenolic compounds actually break down the proteins of the bee/wasp venom.

My 4 year old had a wasp sting on his back at one point- I held the onion to the site for 10 minutes, and swelling and pain were nearly gone... when I removed the onion, the redness and swelling visibly began to reappear (venom proteins were still present causing the reaction). I re-applied the onion again for 30-45 minutes, and pain and swelling reduced immediately, and permanently after that period of time. It's a great natural remedy... keep some on hand! :)


Posted by Leslee (Milburn, Utah) on 08/23/2007
5 out of 5 stars

Slice of onion took the pain away from a bee sting.


Peppermint Oil  

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Posted by Ky Mama (Clinton, Ky) on 01/28/2013
5 out of 5 stars

We have a terrible wasp and yellow jacket problem. We usually use lavender essential oil for mild stings and charcoal poultices for more serious ones. But my children get tired of poultices and find them inconvenient, so they take off the poultices and they end up swelling up. I have found peppermint essential oil, undiluted, takes out the heat and swelling very well, even on bites that are a couple of days old and still bothering them.



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